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Most Vulnerable Drinking Water Systems Due to Drought

By Denise Valenzuela

Posted in

With the state in its driest year on record, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) today announced that it has identified 17 rural communities with vulnerable drinking water systems due to drought conditions.

The 17 rural drinking water systems identified serve communities that range in size from 39 to approximately 11,000 Californians. There are approximately 3,000 community water systems (systems that have at least 15 service connections) that provide water in California.

CDPH will work with the impacted areas to ensure that they have implemented required conservation measures (this could include no outside watering or rationing in addition to proper noticing of system customers of the required conservation measures); identify any possible additional sources (nearby water systems or hauled water); and provide guidance on the possible construction of additional wells to meet the system’s needs.

CDPH’s Drinking Water Program has identified to date the following drinking water systems at greatest risk:

  • Shaver Lake Heights Mutual Water Company (Fresno County)
  • Sierra Cedars Community Services District (Fresno County)
  • Bass Lake Water Company (Madera County)
  • Whispering Pines Apts (Mariposa County)
  • Boulder Canyon Water Association (Kern County)
  • Cypress Canyon Water System (Kern County)
  • Lake Of The Woods Mutual Water Company (Kern County)
  • Camp Condor (Kern County)
  • Jackson Valley Irrigation District (Amador County)
  • City of Willits (Mendocino County)
  • Redwood Valley Community Water District (Mendocino County)
  • Brooktrail Township Community Services District (Mendocino County)
  • Washington Ridge Conservation Camp (Nevada County)
  • Ophir Gardens (Placer County)
  • Lompico County Water District (Santa Cruz County)
  • City of Cloverdale (Sonoma County)
  • Healdsburg (Sonoma County)

The 17 identified may face severe water shortages in the next 60 to 100 days.

The CDPH Drinking Water Program has 23 district offices throughout the state that closely monitor the needs of drinking water systems. CDPH staff works with these systems and local officials to determine access and need. The state will continue to assess California’s drinking water systems to identify and support those potentially at risk.

 

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